The Claremont Colleges Events

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Tuesday, April 4, 2017

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  • Assessment of Significance and Decision-Making in Object Conservation

    12:00 - 1:15 PM
    Hampton Room, Malott Commons
    Scripps College
    345 E. 9th Street
    9th and Columbia
    Claremont, 91711
    Map this Address
    (909) 607-3397

    Lecture given by Ellen Pearlstein, associate professor, UCLA/Getty Program in the Conservation of Archaeological and Ethnographic Materials

  • Tuesday Noon:
    Significance in Conservation Decision-Making

    12:15 - 1:30 PM
    Hampton Room, Malott Commons
    Scripps College
    345 E. 9th Street
    9th and Columbia
    Claremont, 91711
    Map this Address
    (909) 607-8508

    Object conservators make decisions about what to prioritize in a treatment or housing, all of which influence the presentation and interpretation of heritage items. In a class designed to teach the non-neutrality of decision making, conservation students performed significance assessments on family heirlooms and used these to inform treatment and display housing. This lecture will include an analysis into the impact of significance on a range of conservation decisions.

  • Listening to Nature: Standardizing Soundscapes and Imagined Ecologies, 1900-1945

    4:15 - 5:30 PM
    Rembrandt Hall
    Pomona College
    135 E. Bonita Avenue
    Room 104
    Claremont, 91711
    (909) 621-8155

    How did the changing soundscape inform scientists' and then the public's understanding of the environment? How did new sounds and new ways of listening co-develop to ultimately alter the way individuals thought about the world around them? This lecture focuses on two examples from the first half of the 20th century -- the standardization of bird song representation via music notation in the United States and ideas about the sounds of extinction in Germany -- to show the central importance of the soundscape in environmental thought.

  • Denisse Leung Liu & Jennifer King MFA Thesis Show Opening

    6:00 - 9:00 PM
    Art Building
    Claremont Graduate University
    251 E. Tenth Street
    Corner of Tenth and Columbia
    Claremont, 91711
    Map this location.
    (909) 607-3631

    Denisse Leung Liu and Jennifer King: MFA Thesis Exhibition April 3-7, 2017 Opening Reception: Tuesday, April 4, 2017 6 to 9 p.m. Claremont Graduate University 251 E. 10th St., Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 607-3631

  • Scripps Presents:
    Maggie Nelson and Sarah Manguso in Conversation

    6:00 - 7:00 PM
    Garrison Theatre
    Scripps College
    Scripps College Performing Arts Center,
    241 E. 10th Street
    Claremont, 91711
    Map this Address
    (909) 607-8508

    Maggie Nelson and Sarah Manguso take on complex issues of gender, sexuality, family and mothering by deploying forms and styles that are equal parts poetry and essay. In "The Argonauts," Nelson examines pregnancy, new motherhood, her partner's gender transition and the loss of a parent. In "Ongoingness: The End of a Diary," Manguso examines motherhood, a life's record, and that record's discontinuance. Both live in Los Angeles and come to discuss their creative practices and their work. Nelson is a poet, critic, and nonfiction author of books such as The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning, Bluets, and Jane: A Murder. The recipient of the 2016 MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship, she teaches in the School of Critical Studies at California Institute of the Arts. Manguso is the author of seven books that vibrate between essay and poetry, most recently 300 Arguments, The Guardians, and The Two Kinds of Decay. Her writing has been supported by a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Rome Prize.

    Cost:* Free, but RSVP required

  • "The Draft and the Vietnam Generation," film screening and discussion

    7:00 PM
    Crookshank Hall
    Pomona College
    140 E 6th St
    Claremont, 91711
    Map this location.
    (909) 607-3395

    "The Draft and the Vietnam Generation," a 49-minute documentary, weaves together the stories of folks from diverse backgrounds who faced the moral dilemma of being drafted to fight in a war they opposed. Each had to decide what to do: get a deferment, leave the country, became a conscientious objector, or even join the Coast Guard. A few openly violated the draft law and went to prison. By exploring this critical period of American history through the eyes of young people who rejected war, "The Draft and The Vietnam Generation" presents a thoughtful, intimate understanding of why so many defied their government and how resistance to the draft helped fuel the largest peace movement in American history.

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